Categories
Activism Art and Design

Politicized Design: escaping oppressive systems with participatory movements

Watched Politicizing Design from the Grassroots by Bibiana Oliveira SerpaBibiana Oliveira Serpa from Futuress

Drawing from popular activist movements in Latin America, this talk explores the possibilities for the politicization of design.

In her PhD thesis that she recently defended for the Design program of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (ESDI/UERJ) in Brazil, Bibiana delved into her experiences as an active member of different civil society grassroots movements to reveal some of the political, ethical, and practical issues that permeate the transformative action of these collectives.

Through Militant Research Methodology and inspired by her action in the fields of popular education and feminism, she traced paths for a possible politicization of the Design field. In this conversation, Bibiana shares some of the lessons she learned from this journey, articulating four axes she considers crucial for the politicization of Design: ontology, epistemology, practice, and content.

Presented by Bibiana Serpa, a PhD visual designer from Brazil

Design & Opressão (Design and Oppression Network)

Articulação de Mulheres Brasileiras

What is militant research?

  • aims to educate people politically
  • participatory — cannot only research
  • acts in the “context of discovery” not “context of justification” — not seeking to support an existing theory, but to learn
  • always collective

Process of politicization

social movements are self-educating and self-transforming –> politicization

politicization = political learning — “a relational and experiential process”

Categories
Nature

Watched Fantastic Fungi

Watched Fantastic Fungi from netflix.com

Delve into the magical world of fungi, from mushrooms that clear oil spills to underground fungal networks that help trees communicate.

Thought it would be focused on the science of fungi networks and uses of fungi, but those were kind of glossed over in favor of hippie bullshit about spirituality and opening your mind with psychedelics and becoming one with the universe 🙄 Complete with mandala visualizations lmao 🙄🙄🙄 I don’t know who this was aimed at because it’s not changing anyone’s minds about shrooms. There was just enough of the science to keep us watching and thinking it’d go deeper. Disappointing. At least the footage of mushrooms growing in like two seconds was cool.

Categories
Culture Food

Watched On the Job with Priya Krishna

Watched How To Run Brooklyn’s Legendary Tamale Cart | On the Job | Priya Krishna | NYT Cooking from YouTube

Food carts are everywhere in New York City. Hot dogs, coffee, halal, mangoes … The list goes on. There are 20,000 street vendors fueling the city daily, yet …

There is no way this woman makes enough from the amount of work she puts in. Three days of work to make her tamales and maybe she doesn’t even sell them all?! It’s amazing she’s advocating for herself but also super shitty the risk it poses to her as an undocumented immigrant — she says “I’m not scared anymore” but I’m scared on her behalf. It is infuriating that America can’t see the value this woman brings to the community and grant her legal status to open up more opportunities to someone with this kind of work ethic.

Our approach to immigration is ridiculous. The woman in this video was an accountant in Mexico but couldn’t find a job in the US, so now she illegally sells homemade tamales. Here in Seattle, I know an Indian woman whose husband got a tech job but her visa doesn’t allow her to work even though she is *also* a computer scientist. The Egyptian man whose family owns the gas station downtown is an engineer but wasn’t able to transfer his license here, so he works the counter at a quickie mart. What. The. Fuck. How does it benefit the US to deny these skilled people the ability to work in their fields?

We watched the whole On the Job series and there are a bunch of dedicated entrepreneurs running awesome businesses that support their community — and as an outsider feel totally unsustainable because everything relies on them and the help their families can give. It is exhausting watching them. They have the hustle, but I wish they could get some success without having to burn themselves out.

A guy running a bodega has become TikTok famous and people stop in from around the country to enjoy his friendly service: they can hand over any random ingredient in the shop and ask him to make it “ocky style” and he develops an original sandwich recipe on the fly. Crumbling chips or candy onto the sandwich, using doughnuts as the bread, concocting something delicious and unique for over 100 customers a day — plus making hundreds of standard sandwiches — plus he restocks the shelves and runs the cash register if his ten year old nephew can’t be spared to work it.

A woman running a pop-up Instagram restaurant gets her cousin to drive up from Pennsylvania to help each weekend, and a volunteer delivers the food. She has a full-time job and spends her “free time” running the food business. Her expenses have skyrocketed with inflation — mushrooms went from $14 to $20 — but she wants to keep it affordable. Please tell me you are making money at least.

Categories
Food History

Watched Tasting History Fish Pudding

Watched 1950’s Fish Pudding from YouTube

The history of stoves and a 1950s fish pudding recipe

Categories
Food Travel

A contrast in food reviews

Watched 2020 US MRE Menu 20 Sausage Peppers & Onions Review & 2019 Hashbrowns w Bacon Taste Test Comparison from YouTube

The newest US MRE menu for 2020 is a hit – but is it better than the previous Menu #20, Hashbrowns with Bacon?

I enjoy this guy’s earnest, thoughtful, appreciative reviews of MREs.

 

This woman and her mom have a cute rapport. She especially seems to be good at describing flavors — I feel like she has more taste buds than I do 😂 Ok she’s just put more attention and thought into noticing and describing flavor. I like her mom’s fun ways of describing sensations as she eats.

We went to Granville Island once but it was cold and rainy and we weren’t hungry so we only wandered around for an hour 🤷‍♀️ But we did take one of the cute ferries to get there 😄

Categories
Business Writing

Watched Plan Your 2023 Writing Year

Watched

Super useful way to think through the year and see truly how much time I have available to work on projects. Combining this big picture thinking with the 12 Week Year approach for quarter by quarter planning is going to make a big difference in figuring out a reasonable, realistic workload and accomplishing my goals. I hope to publish my first two books in 2023; this exercise made me recognize that is doable but tight since it involves finishing writing one of the books and revising both, plus figuring out a bunch of self-publishing steps I haven’t done before.

I also have to decide if I can afford to take Fridays off of writing as I currently have planned, which only gives me four writing days weekly. Writing only four days a week and giving myself 4 weeks off of writing (two weeks vacation plus two planning weeks) and 2-4 random extra days off a month (appointments, trainings, conferences, headaches, consulting work) works out to about 145-150 working days. Considering I have brain capacity for about 3-4 hours of fiction writing on a standard day, that’s not many hours of actual writing time available, about 430-600 hours for the year. (Of course, that is significantly more than I have been doing, so…)

I’ll definitely need to push back the ARC I scheduled for mid-April 😂 To pick a new date, I’ll need to decide what order I’m going to work on projects — my current plan is to finish writing the rough draft of Book 2, then go back and finish revising Book 1. I was hoping I’d finish writing Book 2 by the end of the year but between my realizations about plot changes and following a mellower writing schedule, that certainly is not happening.

Categories
Entrepreneurship Getting Shit Done

Goal setting considerations

Watched Watch this before you set goals for 2023 ✨ from YouTube

Watch this before you set goals for 2023.

Appreciate this reminder to pace myself in goal setting, and to consider what lifestyle I want and how I want to feel about achieving goals.

Right now I am hoping I have waded through the years of ineffectualness and pushing myself without a break, that I can finally publish the book I’ve been working on for years. Her points about dealing with trauma and prioritizing mental health rings true for me too.

Her explanation of pushing towards goals no matter what makes me think of land nav: you can shoot an azimuth for the destination and scramble cross country on a straight line even though it means climbing straight up a mountain, or you can take the gradual trail that cuts around the slope and is a longer distance but less exhausting and less dangerous.

Categories
Art and Design Culture

Watched Last Week Tonight: Museums

Watched Museums: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) from YouTube

John Oliver discusses some of the world’s most prestigious museums, why they contain so many stolen goods, the market that continues to illegally trade antiq…

Give. It. Back.

See also:

Activism idea: ranking museums by stolen artifacts

Categories
Political Commentary

Watched Last Week Tonight: Qatar World Cup

Watched Qatar World Cup: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) from YouTube

John Oliver discusses the Qatar World Cup, the human rights violations happening in the sporting event’s host country, and what perfection really means to Da…

Kafala system – this form of indentured servitude is basically what Elon Musk envisions for colonizing Mars

Categories
Horror

Watched Wednesday S1E1

Watched Wednesday’s Child Is Full of Woe from netflix.com

Smart, sarcastic and a little dead inside, Wednesday Addams investigates a murder spree while making new friends — and foes — at Nevermore Academy.

🤷‍♀️ Didn’t hate it, didn’t particularly like it. Willing to watch another episode. A little too YA. So far I prefer Christina Ricci’s Wednesday.