Categories
Art and Design Future Building Reuse Technology

Retrocycling as entry to creative reuse

Replied to Field Notes: Why It’s Time for “Retrocycling” – Immerse by an author (Immerse)

Over the past decades, I have explored different approaches for repurposing outdated technologies, including video game consoles from the 1970s; TVs and slide projectors from the 1980s; CD players…

Loosely skimmed the article but love the idea of retrocycling as a way of thinking about reuse and product lifecycles.

Could you host a workshop/ course to encourage hacking old tech?

An interactive event / pop-up space with old games and equipment?

A photography / documentary project where people could celebrate hand-me-downs by sharing their stories? Or a website where people could post their stories?

Categories
Meta The Internet Websites Writing

A decentered argument as website

This whole website nicely complements what I was contemplating recently about blogs.

Some relevant pages:

The bookness of books

Toward a nonlinear essay

You won’t find an instruction manual for writing a nonlinear essay in any of the pieces in this collection. And you won’t find a full argument for writing differently in any single piece, either. But my hope is that both of those things will arise out of the whole collection.

On the virtues of hypertext

In other words, the links matter more than the text.

Brown contrasts the glories of the hypertext web with the relative order of the the social media feed. The feed corrals the unkempt wildness of the web and organizes it all into a nice little stream, filtering out all the noise…

Categories
Music

2022 in Music

collage of 16 top played albums from 2022, including albums by Islands, Tame Impala, Ladytron, Fleet Foxes, Dent May, and Nine Inch Nails
Top played albums of 2022 per Tapmusic (Artists top row l-to-r: Tame Impala, OK Go, Islands, Nine Inch Nails; second row l-to-r: Islands, Abney Park, CRX, Fleet Foxes; third row l-to-r: Islands, The Bird and The Bee, Brave Shores, Dent May; bottom row l-to-r: Goldfrapp, So Below, Gaspard Auge, Ladytron)

What I Listened To

  • 4508 unique tracks
  • 1800 artists
  • 2905 albums
Categories
Outreach Resources and Reference Writing

Inclusive language reference guides

Conscious Style Guide

CSU Diversity/ Inclusivity Style Guide

Radical Copyeditor

 

See also: Disability language best practices

Categories
Culture Meta Music

The sounds we like

Liked Lubricated social networks, great action movies that work without sound, and other pressing questions by Max Read (Read Max)

Reader Stephen writes:
“My conclusion is music made by 20-year-olds currently comes from a different cultural context I am no longer connected to, so it doesn’t resonate unless it sounds like something I already like (i.e. a garage rock band like Dehd). I can’t imagine getting into, like, hyperpop, but, again, I think it’s because it is responding to social and cultural phenomena I am simply not a part of.”

Max answers:

I think you have to think about it dialectically: it’s not just that cool young people who make cool unlistenable music are emerging out of a different context and responding to different cultural prompts than you (or me), it’s also that they are, to various levels of explicit intent, making music that you (and me) specifically will not like, so they will not be exposed to you (and me) and our fatally wack existences in their cool physical/ digital/ mind spaces. The hidden wholeness here is that by the fact of not “getting” the music we are participants in making it good and cool.

Haha, I appreciate when others share my weird fear of getting stuck listening to the same thing, this take is a kind thought 😂

I’m totally fine with aging (really life is getting better) and dgaf (probably actively avoid) what’s “cool.” What I do fear is becoming fixed and not giving new things a chance. (Frankly, this is not something I need to worry about 😉)

But maybe this is something to consider: when are you satisfied in your identity and preferences and can just settle deeper into them?

Is my love of newness culturally-acquired or personal? Does it disguise doubt or dissatisfaction with my tastes, an unknowing or resistance of the self? Is the quest for more music simply a reflection of our culture’s endless consumption, channeled to a medium I care about rather than material goods? Or is it a product of my changing in other ways: that my tastes are ever-shifting and need to be constantly re-found and re-formed through new sounds? Is it habitual or truly preferential? Does it not mean anything? Dunno but it’s interesting to consider, especially for a medium as visceral as music.

I have claimed exploration as part of my identity, but sometimes it’s tiring to always be taking in more information. I’m curious what it would look like to maintain a philosophy of openness without putting so much energy into seeking newness.

Categories
Weeknotes

Weeknotes: Jan 21-27 2023

Stuff I Did:

I have been tired this week! I’m not working that many hours, but it sure feels like I am.

  • Wrote 4.25 hours and did 8 hours consulting work
  • Wrote up my backyard garden installation 🏡
  • Watched a super interesting presentation about politicized design
  • Started cleaning out a room we’ve used for storage and gave away a bunch of stuff on Buy Nothing 💪
  • Sewed buttons onto two coats that have been waiting for five years 😅 Also neither fits so I’m donating them 😂
  • Realized that my backup harddrive had my only copies of some old photos, so I copied those over to OneDrive
  • Subscribed to Bitwarden Premium and ran some password reports, and my work is cut out for me — I’ve been using strong generated passwords for years, but apparently have a lot of old accounts from when I did not 😬
  • Drew a birthday card for a friend — first time breaking out the oil pastels in years!
  • In-person doctor’s appointment 😑
  • One walk with a friend
  • Baked banana bread and made oatmeal bars
  • Made a bunch of dinners and lunches so we could eat out less — mujadara from leftover rice and lentils was a success

Reading:

  • Read Saga Volume 10 and Convergence and For the Throne
  • Started reading Stolen Focus and This is What It Sounds Like
  • Continued reading How to Calm Your Mind
  • DNF’d Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow and The High Commander’s Mate

Words I looked up:

Categories
Finances Political Commentary

The old classic, lying with statistics

Replied to Exaggerating China’s military spending, St. Louis Fed breaks all statistical rules with misleading graph (geopoliticaleconomy.com)

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis published a jaw-droppingly misleading graph that portrays China as spending more on its military than the US. In reality, the Pentagon’s budget is roughly three times larger.

In an accompanying report, the St. Louis Fed admitted that China’s 2021 defense spending was just 1.7% of GDP, “which was the lowest share among the six nations in the figure”.

Yay! I love Actual Propaganda! With a good ol dose of racist fearmongering 🙃

My Biostatistics teacher in college devoted our entire first lecture to discussing ways you could lie with data, so we would be better able to recognize it — and hopefully, not do it.

If we acknowledged how much we waste on bloated military spending, we would have to come to grips with our spending priorities. We would have to acknowledge what we don’t buy with that money. Some of that money could help stop children from going hungry, or keep diabetic people (who aren’t on Medicaid) from dying for lack of affordable medicine 🤷‍♀️ (To name some real problems in the US that shouldn’t be controversial yet somehow are.)

A much more accurate graphic created by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation shows how, as of 2022, the United States spent more on its military than the next nine largest spenders combined – including China, India, the UK, Russia, France, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Japan, and South Korea (and several of these countries are close US allies).

Some of what our $$$$$$$ military spending buys is impressive: a rapid response force that can be wheels up in under 18 hours (the logistics of that alone are mind-blowing), a sophisticated anti-tank weapon that still beats out everything anyone else has and is making a huge impact in Ukraine, and development of GPS.

Preserving self-governance in Ukraine A+++++++ But mayyyyybe we could spare some of the $850 billion we’re spending on the military this year to care directly for people?

Categories
Activism Art and Design

Politicized Design: escaping oppressive systems with participatory movements

Watched Politicizing Design from the Grassroots by Bibiana Oliveira SerpaBibiana Oliveira Serpa from Futuress

Drawing from popular activist movements in Latin America, this talk explores the possibilities for the politicization of design.

In her PhD thesis that she recently defended for the Design program of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (ESDI/UERJ) in Brazil, Bibiana delved into her experiences as an active member of different civil society grassroots movements to reveal some of the political, ethical, and practical issues that permeate the transformative action of these collectives.

Through Militant Research Methodology and inspired by her action in the fields of popular education and feminism, she traced paths for a possible politicization of the Design field. In this conversation, Bibiana shares some of the lessons she learned from this journey, articulating four axes she considers crucial for the politicization of Design: ontology, epistemology, practice, and content.

Presented by Bibiana Serpa, a PhD visual designer from Brazil

Design & Opressão (Design and Oppression Network)

Articulação de Mulheres Brasileiras

What is militant research?

  • aims to educate people politically
  • participatory — cannot only research
  • acts in the “context of discovery” not “context of justification” — not seeking to support an existing theory, but to learn
  • always collective

Process of politicization

social movements are self-educating and self-transforming –> politicization

politicization = political learning — “a relational and experiential process”

Categories
Art and Design Cool Nature

Abstract bubbles beneath ice

Liked iceformation by Ryota Kajita / 梶田亮太 - PhotographerRyota Kajita / 梶田亮太 – Photographer (ryotakajita.com)

His photography series of “Ice Formation” is featured in the magazine “Photo Technique” (November/December 2012), “LENSCRATCH.com”(May 2015), “WIRED.com“ (August 2015), “城市画報 -CITY ZINE-“ (January/Februray 2016), National Geographic Magazine (March 2020) and is represented by Susan Spiritus Gallery in Newport Beach, California and Fotofilmic in Vancouver, Canada.

bubbles beneath ice covered in spiky frostI love the spiky ice atop the frozen surface, the rounded bubbles at center contrasted against the dark depths. A warm fur cloak cocooning a precious cluster of eggs.

white bubbles in a splat of black surrounded by thinning iceI like that the thinning window of ice is at once dendritic, parasitic, the expansion of decay and darkness. And within that hazy-edged darkness, brilliant sharp crystalline bursts of white.

Categories
Art and Design Cool Culture Travel

An artistic virtual journey through Venice

Bookmarked Ca’ Rezzonico – A journey into 18th-Century Venice (Google Arts & Culture)

Suggestions for an artistic itinerary through collections and masterpieces