Categories
Ponderings

Do cats have social contagion with humans?

I just yawned, then my cat did. Happenstance or social contagion?

Categories
Environment Learning

Motivators of Conservation Behavior Change and Pathways to Tap Into Them

Watched Motivators of Conservation Behavior Change and Pathways to Tap Into Them from Eventbrite

This webinar will introduce you to social science tools to amplify strategies to motivate conservation action using a framework to explore diverse pathways to behavior change. These tools provide new lenses and resources to frame communications and mobilize audiences, as well as ideas for adaptive management and evaluation. Participants will get a sneak peek at a soon-to-be-released workbook on pathways to motivating conservation behavior change, designed by the presenters and partners.

Presented by SMANA

Presenters: Lily Maynard, PhD and Lauren Watkins, PhD

Case study: Tanzania chimpanzee habitat protection

  • problem: despite conservation efforts, land still being degraded — small-scale farming biggest contributor to river forest deforestation — they were moving where they farmed because of soil infertility
  • answer: composting!
  • started by engaging with the community
  • baseline survey & interviews: 800 households, 30 villages (who they trust, where they get info)
  • org goal = save forests; farmers’ goal = provide for family; reframing: you have everything around you
  • pilot launch in 3 villages
  • “care for the forest, care for the family”
  • football and netball tournaments; music video; dancing mascot performances; ambassador farmers — raise awareness
  • demo farms to show compost benefits; ambassador farmers trained and built demonstration compost heaps at their homes; made flyer / cartoon
  • trained 400 farmers; thousands of farmers participating — high adoption rates — 5000 compost heaps created
  • taking action good — need to sustain the action too
  • distributed 240000 kg compost samples; farming calendars; radio spots
  • 70% farmers used compost 3+ seasons; 90% farmers believe composting will become typical ag practice in their community
  • will follow up with spatial awareness to see if encouraging composting has reduced damage to habitat
Categories
Health Society

Why others get upset when you mask

Bookmarked Why Do They *Think* That? by JTO, Ph.D. (essaysyoudidntwanttoread.home.blog)

I’ll just give you a non-comprehensive run-down of various biases (which are basically rules of cognition that become errors when they’re incorrectly applied) and heuristics (which are basically thinking shortcuts or strategies that can lead to thinking errors), focusing on those that can cause people to be more alarmed by risk reduction than by the risk posed by actual threats.

Why people don’t seem to care about the health risks”

  • People don’t like to think about death or disability
  • Death and disability are abstract without personal experience
  • Selection and survivorship biases when they only see healthy people out and about
  • People estimate their own risk based on personal experiences
  • “base-rate fallacy: people are much more swayed by single dramatic events than by large numbers or probability statistics”
  • Optimism Bias = expect they’ll have a good outcome
  • Perceived invulnerability = don’t think bad stuff will happen to them
  • Diffusion of Responsibility –> they can’t directly see or be held responsible for the consequences of their actions (e.g. passing along sickness so people you don’t know die)
  • Just World Thinking = “people get what they deserve” because otherwise would have to admit the world is unfair and random, and can attribute their success to their own choices by blaming what others have done differently than them (e.g. get vaxxed)
  • Fundamental Attribution Error, which leads us to focus on personal vs. situational causes for other people’s behavior and outcomes – though not for our own”

Why do people seem to care so much that YOU care about Covid health risks?

  • Cognitive Dissonance
  • Confirmation Bias
  • Psychological Reactance –> people get mad when they think their freedoms are under attack or they’ll lose control –> trying to reassert control
  • “people personalize the actions of others, inferring that those people mean to have a negative effect on them – for example, thinking that masked people are deliberately trying to make them irate or imply they’re stupid” = hostile attribution bias
  • group norms, conformity, and group consensus
  • group think happens when going along with your group trumps making an informed decision –> group polarization = group beliefs gradually become more radical

“People wish to be seen (by themselves and others) as reasonable. Because of this, when folks try to decide on a “rational” response to an environmental threat, they often look at the array of available risk mitigation options and try to pick a percentage of these that is neither an ‘under-response’ or an ‘over-response.’” “Unfortunately, that’s not the way risk actually works; a threat is what it is, and it isn’t going to negotiate with you regarding how much you have to do or what is a “fair” amount of effort.”