Categories
Comics Fantasy

Read Eighty Days

Read Eighty Days

A pilot wants nothing more than to fly. Or so he thought, until he crosses paths with a mysterious thief whose tricks draw him into unchartered territory and new adventure. In a life where the truth changes as quickly as clouds in the sky, the pilot must decide for himself what freedom really means.

“Map A Course, Arrive Safe Home. That’s The Measure Of Your Achievement.” A pilot wants nothing more than to fly. Or so he thought, until he crosses paths with a mysterious thief whose tricks draw him into unchartered territory and new adventure. In a life where the truth changes as quickly as clouds in the sky, the pilot must decide for himself what freedom really means. Award-winning cartoonist A.C. Esguerra presents an unforgettable love letter to flight, the quest for freedom and the greatest adventure of all – love.

Early page

Enjoyed this graphic novel set in an alternate early 20th century world with an invented fascist government. Told partially in epistolary format through logbooks and telegraphs which works reasonably well. The story works, though it shifts midway in genre and central characters due to plot happenings. Incorporating Sable more into the early parts of the book would have helped the transition. Relationships are important to the story moreso than character per se. I would have been interested to understand Jay’s backstory, which I think could have deepened his choices and struggles later in the story.

I understand the limitations of the medium, forcing tradeoffs in how much story you can tell. To make this a single volume graphic novel it couldn’t delve further into these things — I could see this working as a multi-volume work that centered the romance more, with deeper characterization. Or, potentially turning the focus of the book to Sable rather than combining her story with Jay and Fix’s romance — her arc is the most dramatic.

Categories
Fantasy

Read Piranesi

Read Piranesi by Susanna Clarke

Piranesi’s house is no ordinary building: its rooms are infinite, its corridors endless, its walls are lined with thousands upon thousands of statues, each one different from all the others. Within the labyrinth of halls an ocean is imprisoned; waves thunder up staircases, rooms are flooded in an instant. But Piranesi is not afraid; he understands the tides as he understands the pattern of the labyrinth itself. He lives to explore the house.

There is one other person in the house—a man called The Other, who visits Piranesi twice a week and asks for help with research into A Great and Secret Knowledge. But as Piranesi explores, evidence emerges of another person, and a terrible truth begins to unravel, revealing a world beyond the one Piranesi has always known.

Knew nothing about this going in. Strong mood, soothing feel to the way Piranesi relates to the house and lives, then lots of tension as you figure out what’s happening and then watch the character figure out what’s happening. Epistolary style worked well for this. A few slow pages at the start when I wasn’t sure what it was but got drawn in pretty quickly. A smooth read. I wasn’t sure how it would end but thought it was done quite well.