Categories
Culture Society

“The Decline of Wonkiness”

Replied to The Decline of Wonkiness (uliwestphal.de)

Didn’t read the article but I like this phrase, which could be used to describe trends in so many areas.

There’s a connection between the rise of social media and a lower tolerance for wonkiness. When you’re fed photos of other people’s beautiful (staged) homes constantly, you see the imperfections in your own all the more. Something that works but is a bit wonky might not be tolerated any more, culture driving a want for perfection, to live in the dream.

Categories
Getting Shit Done

A diverse pool

Liked Portfolio thinking by Seth Godin (Seth’s Blog)

The mistake we often make is in building a choice set (which we mistakenly call a ‘portfolio’) by trying again and again for one guaranteed ideal choice. That’s not a portfolio. Instead, we should focus on going to the edges, not trying to group everything at some imaginary ‘center’.

Instead of deciding between two similar options, compare two quite different, distinct options.

Interesting to consider because I feel like I often will narrow down options until they’re nearly indistinguishable. Instead of comparing very similar yellow cardigans, pick between a snazzy black jacket and a cozy yellow sweater 🤔

Categories
Personal Growth

Worth Doing Poorly

Quoted

Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly.

Provocative for me, since I struggle with the need to be good at everything I do, and feeling like an idiot if I do something in public and fail.

Categories
Art and Design

Ensō

Bookmarked circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.)

Ensō

I learned why this symbol is on the cover of so many minimalism and self help type books, and in logos!

The ensō symbolizes absolute enlightenment, strength, elegance, the universe, and mu (the void).

Zen practitioners relate the idea to wabi-sabi, the beauty of imperfection. When the circle is closed, it represents perfection.

Usually, a person draws the ensō in one fluid, expressive stroke.