Categories
Cool Learning Resources and Reference Society

UNESCO’s intangible cultural heritage

Bookmarked UNESCO – Dive into intangible cultural heritage! (ich.unesco.org)

I like this map of connections, a fun way to explore all the “intangible cultural heritage of humanity” — which is a very cool list to exist! This is essentially a digital garden focused on all the cultures of the world. Some of these items are extremely specific, which makes sense that cultural practices developed through a group of people in a particular geographic area, in close association with the way they needed to live in that climate and place.

Came across this via the list of “intangible cultural heritage of humanity in urgent need of safeguarding” via the “Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity” via the duduk.

Categories
History

The Unimprovable Tool

Liked Tumblr User Shares A Story How Craftsmen Helped Scientists Identify A Tool Created 50,000 Years Ago And Still by Rugile (Bored Panda)

If you paid any attention in history class, then you’ve definitely heard about a species called the Neanderthals. They lived in Eurasia about 40.000 years ago and despite being extinct for a long time, it turns out there is a certain tool that they left us as a heritage gift. One Tumblr user decided to share his discovery after learning about a tool called a lissoir, which is still used by leather-workers to this day. Turns out, it was actually a leather worker himself who helped the scientists to understand what this weird tool made out of bones was.  

40,000 years in use

Categories
Cool Future Building History

Persian Desert Ice Storage Structure

Liked Yakhchāl (en.m.wikipedia.org)
Yakhchal of Yazd province

“A yakhchāl is an ancient type of evaporative cooler. Above ground, the structure had a domed shape, but had a subterranean storage space. It was often used to store ice, but sometimes was used to store food as well. The subterranean space coupled with the thick heat-resistant construction material insulated the storage space year round.” Wikipedia

“In most yakhchāls, the ice is created by itself during the cold seasons of the year; the water is channeled from the qanat (Iranian aqueduct) to the yakhchāl and it freezes upon resting inside the structure.”

“Sometimes equipped with a system of bâdgirs (ancient design of windcatchers or wind towers) that could easily bring temperatures inside the space down to frigid levels even in summer days… Bâdgirs catch the slightest breeze by the vents at the top and funnel the cooling air down through internal, vertically-placed wooded slats to the water or structure below. Alternately, the bâdgir can function as a chimney, expelling warm air upward to pull cool air in from a base opening…”